OpenStack Summit Day 1 – The Big Tent is BIG, and Tokyo Lessons Learned

oss-gate

My morning started off with a few lessons learned about being in Tokyo, where I speak 0 words of the language.

  • have cash, Japanese cash, if you plan on getting on Tokyo public transit. After learning this lesson I spent 45 minutes looking for a 7-11 (they use Citi ATMs which apparently easier for us gringoes) before getting in a cab to get me to the Summit on time. We passed 4 7-11’s in the first 1/2 mile of my trip. Of Course.

    This guy laughed at me multiple times
    This guy laughed at me multiple times
  • It is a serious walking city. the walking. omg the walking. and then the walking.

But on to the OpenStack Summit stuff, of which there is a lot.

After getting registered with the required keynote addresses. They are all on the schedule, so I won’t go into the who and what, but a few observations.

  1. The production quality is incredibly high. Like giant tv cameras on platforms high. Like 5 big monitors so us in the back can see too, high.

    oss-crowd
    big crowd filing in before the keynotes started
  2. The speakers were, on the whole, a little unpolished. They usually had good things to say, but could have used a few more dry runs for a crowd this big.
  3. ZOMG the crowd. Well over 5000 people from 56 countries. The big tent really is big these days. It is awesome, in a word. It is also the most inclusive conference I’ve ever attended. That is also very awesome.
  4. Double ZOMG THE HEAT. The conference is stretched out over 3 (4?) hotels plus a conference center. All of the thermostats seem to be set on ~81 Farenheit (Celsius?). Take that and toss in an overcrowded room full of sweaty geeks and things can get a little uncomfortable. Especially in the middles of the aisles. Especially especially after lunch.
  5. The Marketplace (vendors tables) is utter chaos. With that said, Mirantis easily wins this year. They have
  6. There is now an OpenStack Certification. Or there will be soon, at least. You can be a Certified OpenStack Administrator (COA). I don’t know how this is going to play with the existing Red Hat Certification, but I’m interested in finding out.
  7. Openstack has a new way of visualizing it constituent parts. http://www.openstack.org/software is way WAY better than the old wiki-style nastiness.
  8. Bitnami COO Erica Brescia took some pretty awesome shots at Docker Hub and its lack of curation. It’s the wild west out there, and it comes with consequences. I’m not a huge fan of Bitnami. But I am a huge fan of how Erica Brescia does her job.

My least favorite observation on the day was Canonical’s slogan for LXD. They had an ad on the spashes before the keynotes started and it was something along the lines of “Ubuntu/Canonical has the fastest hypervisor on the planet with lxd $something $something $something”

Hey Canonical, you are aware that containers and virtual machines are different things, right? So are you trying to re-define the word, or are you trying to pass off a container manager as a hypervisor? Huh? At any rate, it’s an awful slogan and even worse marketecture. I’m debating a drive by of their booth tomorrow.

After lunch I went to a talk held by Mirantis where the compared a base install of their offering to a GA(ish?)-release of RHEL OSP 7. They were more fair and balanced than I thought they would be. Their product, Fuse, is 3 or 4 years old at this point and very polished. OSP 7 uses OSP Director, which is based on TripleO. OSP 7 is Red Hat‘s first release based on this installer. It suffers from exactly the warts you think it would.

With that said, I was surprised they had to pic some pretty small nits to make their presentation work. A lot of their documentation issues were already addressed. But they correctly identified the biggest areas of need for OSPd as Red Hat works to mature it in OSP 8 and beyond.

All in all Day 1 was great fun. I’m looking way forward to Day 2. On top of that I’m PRETTY SURE I can get to and return from the conference using Tokyo Public Transport.

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